Agenda and draft minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, Trafford Town Hall, Talbot Road, Stretford

Contact: Ian Cockill  Governance Officer

Note: Please note that the meeting will also be streamed live in line with the principles of openness and transparency in local government. To access the live stream of the meeting, please paste the following into your browser's address bar: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCjwbIOW5x0NSe38sgFU8bKg 

Items
No. Item

30.

Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Minutes:

As this was the first Council meeting since the sad passing of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, the Council stood for a minute’s silence to formally pay its respects and honour her late Majesty.

31.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 425 KB

To approve as a correct record the Minutes of the Meeting of the Council held on 27 July 2022, for signature by the Mayor as Chair of the Council.

Minutes:

RESOLVED: That the Minutes of the Meeting of the Council held on 27 July 2022, be approved as a correct record and signed by the Chair, subject to noting that with regard to Minute 27 “Save Our Rivers Motion”, the amendment submitted and listed with the agenda Summons was moved, seconded, voted upon and declared lost.

32.

Announcements

To receive any announcements from the Mayor, Leader of the Council, Members of the Executive, Chairs of Scrutiny Committees and the Head of Paid Service.

Minutes:

Health Scrutiny Announcement – Altrincham Minor Injuries Unit

 

Councillor Whetton, Chair of Health Scrutiny Committee announced that at its last two meetings the Committee had investigated the ongoing closed status of the Altrincham minor injuries unit and had been led to believe that a phased re-opening of the unit would commence in January 2023, however, the plan had been overtaken by events elsewhere and now stood to be delayed somewhat further whilst more review work was undertaken. The Health Scrutiny Committee was very concerned about the continued closure of the minor injuries unit and believed that the message it sends out to the community creates concerns as to the ongoing wider use of Altrincham General Hospital site. The Committee had called for the NHS to re-open the unit as speedily as possible and to give clear unambiguous signals that the rest of the hospitals uses were there to stay.

33.

Questions By Members pdf icon PDF 196 KB

This is an opportunity for Members of Council to ask the Mayor, Members of the Executive or the Chairs of any Committee or Sub-Committee a question on notice under Procedure Rule 10.2.

Minutes:

The Mayor reported that 5 questions had been received under Procedure Rule 10.2.

 

(a)    Councillor Zhi asked the following question, the first of two questions for which he had given notice:

 

“Can the Executive Member for Environmental Services please provide me with an update on the current position with recruitment and temporary backfilling of roles for the bin crews?”

 

In response, Councillor Adshead, the Executive Member reported that the waste service required between 106 and 111 staff depending on seasonal requirements, levels of holidays and other absences. The service currently employed 99 full-time equivalent staff and in addition had 13 regular temporary staff supplied by a recruitment agency. The service, therefore, had 7 full-time vacancies and intended to move suitable staff from temporary to permanent contracts 12 weeks employment.

 

As a supplementary question Councillor Zhi asked what additional actions were planned to get services to a level that his constituents and all Trafford residents expect and deserve. Councillor Adshead advised that performance penalties for the Council’s delivery partner Amey were being implemented for any poor service. An issue had been identified in respect of Monday waste collections and an action plan had been formulated with a report on implementation expected to the Executive in the near future.

 

(b)    Councillor Zhi asked the following question, the second of two questions for which he had given notice:

 

““The government has delivered over £37 billion in a package of support, including £1,200 for the lowest-income families to support families in the UK with the cost of living this year.

 

Can the Executive Member for Finance and Governance outline what further plans the Council has to support Trafford residents with the cost of living?"

 

In response, Councillor Ross, the Executive Member confirmed that a written response had been provided to Councillor Zhi which is set out as follows:

 

“Thank you for your question. Councillors have been voicing concern about the cost of living crisis for many months and the Executive have been working closely with officers on Trafford Council’s response.

 

Since the summer we have been collaborating with housing providers, our community hubs, our local Citizens Advice Service and other partners to co-ordinate a joined-up response at a neighbourhood level.

 

We are opening up community living rooms- providing a place that is warm and an alternative to heating your own home. The projected impact of this initiative will be approximately 13,000 hours of access to warm, safe, welcoming living rooms. This initiative will also provide a social space and access to advice and information regarding local support and services.  This initiative will run from October 2022 until March 2023.

 

We have been working with our partners to explore extra capacity for welfare rights advice- helping people navigate social security and providing help with maximising income.  This partnership work has included our in-house Welfare Rights Service, equivalent services provided by our local housing associations and our local Citizens Advice Service.

 

We are launching a cost of living awareness campaign- including a leaflet and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 33.

34.

Membership of Committees

To note Councillor Newgrosh replaced Councillor Brophy as a reserve Member of Planning and Development Management Committee with effect from 30 August 2022.

Minutes:

 

RESOLVED: That the Council notes that Councillor Newgrosh replaced Councillor Brophy as a reserve Member of Planning and Development Management Committee, with effect from 30 August 2022.

 

35.

Petition - Road Safety and Traffic Management, South Downs Road

To consider the following petition requiring debate:

 

We the undersigned (517 signatories) petition the council to create a 20mph zone around South Downs Road, from Langham Road and including Grange and Marlborough Roads. We also request visible signage, traffic calming measures and wider pathways.

 

This is a key route to Bowdon Church School, the Bollin School and Altrincham Grammar School for Boys. Few people walk or cycle along the road as the pavement is too narrow for pushchairs and speeding traffic means it is perceived by parents as too busy to cycle safely.

A 20mph limit would create greater safety for our children and benefit the whole community. It would alleviate parking issues, congestion and standing traffic as more pupils will be able to get to school by foot or bike.

Please reduce the speed limit, introduce appropriate signage warning drivers and implement traffic calming measures. This would create a more accessible link between Bowdon and Hale.

 

Note: In accordance with the Council’s Petition Scheme, a petition containing more than 500 signatures will be debated by the Council. The petition organiser will be given five minutes to present the petition and then it will be discussed by the Council for a maximum of 15 minutes.

Minutes:

Petitioner, Bridget Green introduced the following petition which had received 517 signatures from addresses within the Borough.

 

“We petition the Council to create a 20mph zone around South Downs Road, from Langham Road and including Grange and Marlborough Roads. We also request visible signage, traffic calming measures and wider pathways.

 

This is a key route to Bowdon Church School, the Bollin School and Altrincham Grammar School for Boys. Few people walk or cycle along the road as the pavement is too narrow for pushchairs and speeding traffic means it is perceived by parents as too busy to cycle safely.

A 20mph limit would create greater safety for our children and benefit the whole community. It would alleviate parking issues, congestion and standing traffic as more pupils will be able to get to school by foot or bike.

Please reduce the speed limit, introduce appropriate signage warning drivers and implement traffic calming measures. This would create a more accessible link between Bowdon and Hale.”

 

In presenting the petition, the petitioner emphasised that the major safety concerns were the narrowness of the pavement which placed pedestrians in danger of oncoming traffic and the frequency in which vehicles mounted the pavement. Also, if people were to be encouraged to use more active forms of travel as a means of alleviating the congestion which was intensifying problems in the area, more safe routes were needed to do that. Appreciating that funding was extremely tight, the petitioner appealed for some creative ways to make it happen.

 

Councillor Adshead, Executive Member for Environmental Services and Councillors Whetton, Brophy and Leicester responded to the petition on behalf of the political parties and made the following points:

 

Councillor Adshead: Recognised that safety around schools was an issue across the Borough and the Council was currently trialling “school streets” a safety scheme as well as implementing a range of road safety schemes and initiatives. The Road Safety Team would now investigate the petition’s request and consider the various options. The Council continued to explore options to secure more funding and would press Transport for Greater Manchester for the expansion of 20mph zones.

 

Councillor Whetton: Feared that changes to the street scene infrastructure may place some of the petition’s objectives too far from reach given the realistic of cost. Despite the 20mph concept having detractors, it was certainly a visible alert to drivers to slow down and focus their minds to the circumstances in the immediate area. With qualified support he awaited the reflections of the Leader of the Council.

 

Councillor Brophy: The petition clearly showed the strength of feeling amongst residents for a 20mph zone and was another example of the feeling across the Borough. Spoke in favour of 20mph speed limit areas and the petitions objectives.

 

Councillor Leicester: Petition highlighted the public concern for road safety in general and specifically the issues of South Downs Road. Believed South Downs Road could be a major walking route between the south of Hale and the primary and secondary schools  ...  view the full minutes text for item 35.

36.

Publication of Members' Addresses on the Declaration of Interests Register pdf icon PDF 211 KB

To consider a report of the Director of Legal and Governance and Monitoring Officer following recommendation from the Standards Committee on 22 September 2022.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Council received a report of the Director of Legal and Governance and Monitoring Officer presenting Standards Committee’s recommendation from its meeting held on 22 September 2022, in respect of the publication of members’ addresses on the public register of Members’ Interests.

 

RESOLVED:

 

(1)       That the reports, investigations and consultation undertaken by the Standards Committee, be noted.

 

(2)       That the Council adopts a blanket policy whereby all Members’ addresses are treated as sensitive interests and are not made publicly available.

37.

Treasury Management Annual Performance 2021/22 Report pdf icon PDF 871 KB

To note a report of the Executive Member for Finance and Governance further to consideration by Accounts and Audit Committee on 20 July 2022 and the Executive on 25 July 2022.

Minutes:

The Executive Member for Finance and Governance and the Director of Finance and Systems submitted a joint report outlining the main treasury management activities undertaken during 2021/22. The report had been presented to Accounts and Audit Committee on 20 July 2022 and the Executive on 25 July 2022.

 

RESOLVED: That the report be noted.

38.

Motion Submitted by the Green Party Group - Vision Zero

This Council notes that 55 people were killed or seriously injured on its roads in 2019 and that this is 25% higher than the number in 2011 (44). In 2020, despite far lower overall traffic due to the pandemic, there were 7 fatalities, the third highest year in the decade 2011-2020. This Council believes that more needs to be done to reduce the number of casualties on its roads.

 

This Council notes that "Vision Zero" has been successful in many cities, regions and states worldwide. Vision Zero achieves change by combining strong enforcement of traffic law and better roadway engineering, with campaigns to encourage careful life-saving behaviour and to end dangerous anti-social behaviour by road users. This Council notes that Vision Zero not only improves road safety but can also help to tackle:

 

-         high levels of inactivity and poor public health;

-         poor air quality;

-         rising carbon emissions from road transport;

-         congestion; and

-         nuisance noise

 

Each of these great road issues is estimated to cost Trafford millions of pounds every year. Reported road casualties in Trafford alone caused societal costs (medical and ambulance, lost output and human cost) of £23.2 million in 2019, according to the Department for Transport’s statistics, based on police records.

 

Almost all other forms of transport now have extremely low, or zero levels of casualties associated with their use. This Council believes that, in relation to road transport, the only justifiable target should be that in the longer term noone is killed or seriously injured on the roads that it manages.

 

This Council notes that Vision Zero requires substantial change over the longer term so that our streets offer a fairer balance between people and motor vehicles. These changes include less traffic, slower speeds, safe street design, safe space for cycling, safe junctions and crossings, safe vehicles and safe behaviour by road users backed up by robust enforcement.

 

This Council calls on the administration to take a bold approach to the safety of those travelling on its roads and especially those who are the most vulnerable – people on foot, people cycling and people on motorcycles. We need:

 

-         an ambitious target to cut road deaths and serious injuries to zero by 2040 – with an interim target of reducing our numbers by 50% by 2030, compared with our average of 46 from 2011-2020.

-         a clear Vision Zero action plan (using changes listed above) that drives progress on safety;

-         effort to secure the necessary funding from sources such as grants, section 106 funding and revenue raising measures such as taking up the newly available power to enforce against moving traffic offences and issue penalty charge notices for contraventions;

-         a recognition that this can’t be done by Trafford Council alone. The council will work with other bodies and authorities, such as the Greater Manchester Police, Transport for Greater Manchester, Highways England and Active Travel England, and ask them to do more to help reach Trafford’s Vision Zero goals.

-  ...  view the full agenda text for item 38.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

It was moved and seconded that:

 

“This Council notes that 55 people were killed or seriously injured on its roads in 2019 and that this is 25% higher than the number in 2011 (44). In 2020, despite far lower overall traffic due to the pandemic, there were 7 fatalities, the third highest year in the decade 2011-2020. This Council believes that more needs to be done to reduce the number of casualties on its roads.

 

This Council notes that "Vision Zero" has been successful in many cities, regions and states worldwide. Vision Zero achieves change by combining strong enforcement of traffic law and better roadway engineering, with campaigns to encourage careful life-saving behaviour and to end dangerous anti-social behaviour by road users. This Council notes that Vision Zero not only improves road safety but can also help to tackle:

 

-         high levels of inactivity and poor public health;

-         poor air quality;

-         rising carbon emissions from road transport;

-         congestion; and

-         nuisance noise

 

Each of these great road issues is estimated to cost Trafford millions of pounds every year. Reported road casualties in Trafford alone caused societal costs (medical and ambulance, lost output and human cost) of £23.2 million in 2019, according to the Department for Transport’s statistics, based on police records.

 

Almost all other forms of transport now have extremely low, or zero levels of casualties associated with their use. This Council believes that, in relation to road transport, the only justifiable target should be that in the longer term no one is killed or seriously injured on the roads that it manages.

 

This Council notes that Vision Zero requires substantial change over the longer term so that our streets offer a fairer balance between people and motor vehicles. These changes include less traffic, slower speeds, safe street design, safe space for cycling, safe junctions and crossings, safe vehicles and safe behaviour by road users backed up by robust enforcement.

 

This Council calls on the administration to take a bold approach to the safety of those travelling on its roads and especially those who are the most vulnerable – people on foot, people cycling and people on motorcycles. We need:

 

-         an ambitious target to cut road deaths and serious injuries to zero by 2040 – with an interim target of reducing our numbers by 50% by 2030, compared with our average of 46 from 2011-2020.

-         a clear Vision Zero action plan (using changes listed above) that drives progress on safety;

-         effort to secure the necessary funding from sources such as grants, section 106 funding and revenue raising measures such as taking up the newly available power to enforce against moving traffic offences and issue penalty charge notices for contraventions;

-         a recognition that this can’t be done by Trafford Council alone. The council will work with other bodies and authorities, such as the Greater Manchester Police, Transport for Greater Manchester, Highways England and Active Travel England, and ask them to do more to  ...  view the full minutes text for item 38.

39.

Motion Submitted by the Labour Group - The Energy and Cost of Living Crises

We have an energy crisis of huge magnitude hanging over our heads and the assistance offered by the government so far is of little help to those already in fuel poverty. The help is not targeted at those who most need it. Businesses and public sector organisations also continue to face uncertainty.

 

Meantime, energy providers such as BP and Shell continue to make massive profits, and the government is launching a new oil and gas licensing round and lifting the moratorium on UK shale gas production, when there is clear scientific evidence that we must keep fossil fuels in the ground to avert climate breakdown.

 

Our energy security has been under threat for some time, and not only because of the importance of supporting Ukraine. Climate change, extreme weather conditions and a lack of investment in infrastructure are also impacting this.  

  

It does not need to be like this.  Instead of a piece meal approach, a long-term energy plan should have been started years ago.

 

The government could have reduced our dependency on fossil fuels and the vagaries of the energy market by investing in renewables and green technology, so honouring its commitment to reducing carbon emissions and addressing the climate emergency. 

 

The government could have increased its long duration energy storage capabilities (LDES), thus obviating the wastage of energy from renewables, and could have decided not to close gas storage facilities.  

 

The government could have initiated an immediate accessible insulation programme to ensure that everyone is warm and to reduce energy consumption. 

 

This energy crisis has been one of the main drivers behind our cost of living crisis, a crisis exacerbated in recent weeks by the reckless behaviour demonstrated by the Government in the form of its ‘mini-budget’, with the threat of further cuts to services.  Whilst the richest 5% would have benefited from unfunded tax cuts, many more households face higher mortgage rates and seeing their pensions put at risk as the markets act with alarm in response to the government’s irresponsible fiscal policy. A combination of the energy crisis and recent fiscal measures have put many households across Trafford in a precarious position.

 

The Council - while recognising that these are not measures one of the richest countries in the world should have to consider - resolves to: 

 

-         Continue to find ways to support our residents and local businesses in accessing the welfare benefits, grants and payments due to them. 

-         Provide free accessible friendly Warm Hubs where our residents can stay as long as they like and have access to hot drinks.

-         Provide information for residents and local businesses on creative ways to save energy.

-         Support local community and co-operative initiatives to deliver investment in renewables, such as the Trafford for Solar Community Benefit Society solar offer.

 

The Council resolves to write to the Government to demand:

 

-         An urgent targeted increased assistance package for those on prepayment meters, low incomes, disabilities.

-         The reintroduction of the £20 a week uplift  ...  view the full agenda text for item 39.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

It was moved and seconded that:

 

We have an energy crisis of huge magnitude hanging over our heads and the assistance offered by the government so far is of little help to those already in fuel poverty. The help is not targeted at those who most need it. Businesses and public sector organisations also continue to face uncertainty.

 

Meantime, energy providers such as BP and Shell continue to make massive profits, and the government is launching a new oil and gas licensing round and lifting the moratorium on UK shale gas production, when there is clear scientific evidence that we must keep fossil fuels in the ground to avert climate breakdown.

 

Our energy security has been under threat for some time, and not only because of the importance of supporting Ukraine. Climate change, extreme weather conditions and a lack of investment in infrastructure are also impacting this.  

 

It does not need to be like this.  Instead of a piece meal approach, a long-term energy plan should have been started years ago.

 

The government could have reduced our dependency on fossil fuels and the vagaries of the energy market by investing in renewables and green technology, so honouring its commitment to reducing carbon emissions and addressing the climate emergency. 

 

The government could have increased its long duration energy storage capabilities (LDES), thus obviating the wastage of energy from renewables, and could have decided not to close gas storage facilities.  

The government could have initiated an immediate accessible insulation programme to ensure that everyone is warm and to reduce energy consumption. 

 

This energy crisis has been one of the main drivers behind our cost of living crisis, a crisis exacerbated in recent weeks by the reckless behaviour demonstrated by the Government in the form of its ‘mini-budget’, with the threat of further cuts to services.  Whilst the richest 5% would have benefited from unfunded tax cuts, many more households face higher mortgage rates and seeing their pensions put at risk as the markets act with alarm in response to the government’s irresponsible fiscal policy. A combination of the energy crisis and recent fiscal measures have put many households across Trafford in a precarious position.

 

The Council - while recognising that these are not measures one of the richest countries in the world should have to consider - resolves to: 

 

-         Continue to find ways to support our residents and local businesses in accessing the welfare benefits, grants and payments due to them. 

-         Provide free accessible friendly Warm Hubs where our residents can stay as long as they like and have access to hot drinks.

-         Provide information for residents and local businesses on creative ways to save energy.

-         Support local community and co-operative initiatives to deliver investment in renewables, such as the Trafford for Solar Community Benefit Society solar offer.

 

The Council resolves to write to the Government to demand:

 

-         An urgent targeted increased assistance package for those on prepayment meters, low incomes, disabilities.

-  ...  view the full minutes text for item 39.

40.

Motion Submitted by the Labour Group - Asbestos

This motion asks the Ministers for Health and Environment to create an Asbestos Register of Public Buildings containing Asbestos and provide financial support in removing Asbestos from both public buildings and workplaces to eradicate Mesothelioma and other asbestos related diseases.

 

Asbestos use has been banned from use in buildings since 1999, but there is little action in removing the substance from buildings built pre-1999, many thousands of workplaces, public buildings and education facilities.

 

1.   These older buildings have varying amounts of asbestos and any form of disturbance can cause strands to become airborne, potentially being inhaled and causing disease.

2.   Asbestos has been used in Water Heaters, Air Conditioning, Ducting, Boilers, Paint, Ceilings, Drywalls and even carpet underlay.

3.   This is an invisible killer and those affected receive diagnosis at the end of the 30 plus year incubation period, and way past any treatment other than palliative care. The concerns around the use of Asbestos were first raised in 1898 by HM Chief Inspector of Factories, and 97 years later Blue and Brown Asbestos imports were banned, followed 14 years later in 1999. Yet in 2019 there were 5000 deaths from Asbestos related diseases of which 2340 were from Mesothelioma.

4.   The HSE recognises that workers within the building trade, demolition, facilities management and Fire Fighters are most at risk and some of these workers could be exposed, unknowingly, up to 100 times per year.

This Council resolves that the CEO of the Council writes to the above ministers to highlight the need of a register and asking them to develop a plan to facilitate removal of Asbestos from buildings to protect the workforce and provide financial support to remove this dangerous substance and allow safe working spaces for all.

Minutes:

It was moved and seconded that:

 

This motion asks the Ministers for Health and Environment to create an Asbestos Register of Public Buildings containing Asbestos and provide financial support in removing Asbestos from both public buildings and workplaces to eradicate Mesothelioma and other asbestos related diseases.

 

Asbestos use has been banned from use in buildings since 1999, but there is little action in removing the substance from buildings built pre-1999, many thousands of workplaces, public buildings and education facilities.

 

1.      These older buildings have varying amounts of asbestos and any form of disturbance can cause strands to become airborne, potentially being inhaled and causing disease.

2.      Asbestos has been used in Water Heaters, Air Conditioning, Ducting, Boilers, Paint, Ceilings, Drywalls and even carpet underlay.

3.      This is an invisible killer and those affected receive diagnosis at the end of the 30 plus year incubation period, and way past any treatment other than palliative care. The concerns around the use of Asbestos were first raised in 1898 by HM Chief Inspector of Factories, and 97 years later Blue and Brown Asbestos imports were banned, followed 14 years later in 1999. Yet in 2019 there were 5000 deaths from Asbestos related diseases of which 2340 were from Mesothelioma.

4.      The HSE recognises that workers within the building trade, demolition, facilities management and Fire Fighters are most at risk and some of these workers could be exposed, unknowingly, up to 100 times per year.

 

This Council resolves that the Chief Executive Officer of the Council writes to the above ministers to highlight the need of a register and asking them to develop a plan to facilitate removal of Asbestos from buildings to protect the workforce and provide financial support to remove this dangerous substance and allow safe working spaces for all.

 

Following speeches in support of the matter, the Motion was declared carried with the unanimous consent of the Council.

 

RESOLVED: That this motion asks the Ministers for Health and Environment to create an Asbestos Register of Public Buildings containing Asbestos and provide financial support in removing Asbestos from both public buildings and workplaces to eradicate Mesothelioma and other asbestos related diseases.

 

Asbestos use has been banned from use in buildings since 1999, but there is little action in removing the substance from buildings built pre-1999, many thousands of workplaces, public buildings and education facilities.

 

1.      These older buildings have varying amounts of asbestos and any form of disturbance can cause strands to become airborne, potentially being inhaled and causing disease.

2.      Asbestos has been used in Water Heaters, Air Conditioning, Ducting, Boilers, Paint, Ceilings, Drywalls and even carpet underlay.

3.      This is an invisible killer and those affected receive diagnosis at the end of the 30 plus year incubation period, and way past any treatment other than palliative care. The concerns around the use of Asbestos were first raised in 1898 by HM Chief Inspector of Factories, and 97 years later Blue and Brown Asbestos imports were banned, followed  ...  view the full minutes text for item 40.

41.

Motion Submitted by the Labour Group - Fracking

Trafford Council voted in November 2018 to reject Fracking in this borough.

 

Fracking was suspended in 2019 because of concerns about unpredictability of earth tremors as witnessed in Lancashire.

 

Nothing has changed since then except the Conservatives have changed their leader and our prime minister.  That Prime Minister now thinks that Fracking is the answer to the energy crisis by creating home produced gas and it will help economic growth.

 

A Cuadrilla representative has said in a Guardian exclusive on 21 September 2022 that Fracking in the UK is difficult because its geology is not suitable, further putting into question its viability.

 

The Government have signed up to crucial international commitments on net zero; Fracking potentially undermines these.

 

The wrong decisions on energy have already been made that mean that over 60% of our energy requirements now rely on gas.  The UK should be taking the opportunity to reduce reliance on gas as we did with coal.  Gas should stay in the ground to support our net zero commitments.

 

Fracking is an industry that has failed in the UK but it keeps getting brought back by Conservative governments despite the mounting evidence.

 

Despite the Fracking fantasies of this government and their potential financial incentives to local communities to accept Fracking.  We call on this Council, its councillors and the boroughs’ MPs to reaffirm their rejection of Fracking in Trafford.

 

We further call on fellow neighbouring councils to reject Fracking too in Greater Manchester, Cheshire and Lancashire.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

It was moved and seconded that:

 

Trafford Council voted in November 2018 to reject Fracking in this borough.

 

Fracking was suspended in 2019 because of concerns about unpredictability of earth tremors as witnessed in Lancashire.

 

Nothing has changed since then except the Conservatives have changed their leader and our prime minister. That Prime Minister now thinks that Fracking is the answer to the energy crisis by creating home produced gas and it will help economic growth.

 

A Cuadrilla representative has said in a Guardian exclusive on 21 September 2022 that Fracking in the UK is difficult because its geology is not suitable, further putting into question its viability.

 

The Government have signed up to crucial international commitments on net zero; Fracking potentially undermines these.

 

The wrong decisions on energy have already been made that mean that over 60% of our energy requirements now rely on gas. The UK should be taking the opportunity to reduce reliance on gas as we did with coal.  Gas should stay in the ground to support our net zero commitments.

 

Fracking is an industry that has failed in the UK but it keeps getting brought back by Conservative governments despite the mounting evidence.

 

Despite the Fracking fantasies of this government and their potential financial incentives to local communities to accept Fracking. We call on this Council, its councillors and the boroughs’ MPs to reaffirm their rejection of Fracking in Trafford.

 

We further call on fellow neighbouring councils to reject Fracking too in Greater Manchester, Cheshire and Lancashire.”

 

It was moved and seconded as an amendment that:

 

“Trafford Council voted in November 2018 to reject Ffracking in this borough.

 

Fracking was suspended in 2019 because of concerns about unpredictability of earth tremors as witnessed in Lancashire and the potential harm it would bring to local communities and the local environment.

 

Nothing has changed since then except the Conservatives we nowhave changed their leader and our prime minister. That a Prime Minister now who thinks that Ffracking is the an answer to improving the UK’s energy crisis security by creating home produced gas and that it will help boost economic growth.

 

AThe founder ofCuadrilla representative Resources has said in a Guardian exclusive on 21 September 2022 that Ffracking in the UK is difficult because its geology means it is not suitableharder and more expensive to extract gas in this manner and the population density of the UK is such that commercially viable wells are limited, further putting into question its viability.

 

The Government have signed up to crucial international commitments on net zero; Ffracking potentially undermines these.

 

The wrong decisions on energy have already been made that mean that UK’s commitment to reduce emissions rightly led to a reduction in the use of coal, but that reduction has led to anover 60% of our energy requirements now rely reliance on naturalgas. The UK should be taking the  ...  view the full minutes text for item 41.