Agenda and minutes

Venue: Council Chamber, Trafford Town Hall, Talbot Road, Stretford

Contact: Ian Cockill  Democratic Services Officer

Webcast: View the webcast

Items
No. Item

45.

Minutes pdf icon PDF 231 KB

To approve as a correct record the Minutes of the Meeting of the Council held on 26 September 2018 for signature by the Mayor as Chairman.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

That the Minutes of the Meeting of the Council held on 26 September 2018, be approved as a correct record and signed by the Chair.

 

46.

Announcements

To receive any announcements from the Mayor, Leader of the Council, Members of the Executive, Chairmen of Scrutiny Committees and the Head of Paid Service.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(a)        Best High Street

 

The Mayor was pleased to report that Altrincham’s high street had been awarded the best in the country in the Great British High Street awards run by the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government and conveyed congratulations to all involved. Altrincham was the only North West town to be nominated and beat 12 other finalists in the England category to win the Champion High Street award and a cheque for £5000.

 

(b)        Manchester Half Marathon

 

The Mayor took the opportunity to congratulate all those who had participated in the Manchester Half Marathon held within Trafford in October, particularly Councillors Sean Anstee, Kevin Procter and Graham Whitham, together with Richard Roe and Graeme Bentley from officer management team, who all completed the course in fine times. The Mayor conveyed thanks to everyone who had made the event such a great success and thanked Councillors Procter and Whitham for the money they raised for his Mayoral Charity.

 

(c)        Scrutiny Committee

 

Councillor Acton, the Chair of Scrutiny Committee reminded the Council that the Budget Scrutiny Sessions would be held on 4 and 6 December 2018 and that all Scrutiny Members were welcome to attend.

 

(d)        Health Scrutiny Committee

 

Councillor Chilton, Chair of Health Scrutiny Committee reported that the Committee was potentially expanding the role of its Task and Finish Groups to look at Community Services and that he would keep Members updated. Councillor Chilton also thanked Councillor Boyes for advising the Committee that the new Joint Health Hospital Trust was currently subject to a Care Quality Commission Inspection, the results of which were anticipated to be shared with Members in January 2019.

 

(e)        Children and Young People’s Scrutiny Committee

 

Councillor Denise Western, Chair of Children and Young People’s Scrutiny Committee reported that the Task and Finish Group was continuing its work on Special Educational Needs and Disability provision in Trafford and looked forward to reporting back on this in due course.

 

(f)         Waterside Arts Centre

 

The Mayor congratulated the Waterside Arts Centre in Sale and all its staff on recently being named Venue of the Year in the 2018 Northern Soul Awards that celebrated culture and enterprise across the North of England.

47.

Questions By Members pdf icon PDF 156 KB

This is an opportunity for Members of Council to ask the Mayor, Members of the Executive or the Chairman of any Committee or Sub-Committee a question on notice under Procedure Rule 10.2.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Mayor reported that 7 questions had been received under Procedure Rule 10.2.

 

(a)    Councillor Mrs. Evans asked the following question for which she had given notice:

 

“Concerns have been raised about the imminent closure of the Trafford Powerleague site in Davyhulme and the significant and adverse implication for local football teams with the loss of pitches. Whilst this is recognised as a commercial decision, please could the Executive Member advise what steps they are able to take to ensure a good level of provision of pitches for hire by the local community in the borough and where these local teams will be able to play in future?”

 

Councillor Procter, the Executive Member for Communities and Housing echoed the fact that it was a commercial decision that the Council had no control over but had serious implications. He reported that the Council had met with Trafford Leisure and the Manchester and Cheshire Football Associations in an attempt to identify any spare capacity both indoor and outdoor for current users of the Powerleague and that dialogue would continue together with signposting clubs leagues and other users to alternative sites. The Council was also in discussion with the owners of the facility about refurbishment of the building and potential new football operations in the long-term and if they proved satisfactory more information would be provided in due course.

 

In addition to the short-term solution, the Council alongside the Football Foundation and local County Football Associations was working to approve the Local Football Facilities Plan which would set out the strategy for provision over the medium to long-term and clubs and leagues would be invited to review the outcomes.

 

The Executive Member wished to assure Councillor Mrs. Evans that the administration shared her concerns and that every effort was being made to find an appropriate solution and that he would be happy to keep her updated.

 

Councillor Mrs. Evans asked as a supplementary question whether the administration would accept that the Investment Plans for Turn Moss and George H. Carnall could have been positive for the local communities and now left a gap of poor provision which would have mitigated against the loss of public sector investment and could the administration make clear what their long-term plans would be. Councillor Proctor believed this to be a separate question to the initial question he had answered concerning Powerleague. He was obviously concerned about the long-term health strategy and the impact on younger people and had already outlined the long-term actions on which the Council would be moving forward.

 

(b)    Councillor N. Evans asked the following question for which he had given notice:

 

“In a recent Council news release, the Executive Member acknowledged the overwhelming success of the Town Centre Loan Scheme in supporting new businesses, creating jobs and helping our town centres to thrive.  However, at the end of the release it confirmed that the Council has now suspended new applications, why?”

 

Councillor Wright, the Executive Member for Investment, Regeneration and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 47.

48.

Appointments to Outside Bodies 2018/19

To note that the Interim Chief Executive, in consultation with the Leader of the Council, appointed Councillor Kevin Procter as the Council’s representative on the Greater Manchester Combined Authority Statutory Functions Committee, as a replacement for Councillor Lawrence Walsh effective from 28 September 2018.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

RESOLVED: That Council notes that the Interim Chief Executive, in consultation with the Leader of the Council, appointed Councillor Kevin Procter as the Council’s representative on the Greater Manchester Combined Authority Statutory Functions Committee, as a replacement for Councillor Lawrence Walsh, effective from 28 September 2018.

49.

Recruitment of Head of Paid Service / Chief Executive pdf icon PDF 158 KB

To consider a report of the Corporate Director of People.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Corporate Director of People submitted a report seeking formal approval of the recommendation by the Appointments Committee to appoint a permanent Chief Executive / Head of Paid Service, following the recruitment process undertaken during October / November 2018.

 

RESOLVED: That the appointment of Sara Todd as Chief Executive and Head of Paid Service be approved and that a formal offer of appointment be made.

50.

Constitution Working Group – Proposed Changes to the Council’s Constitution pdf icon PDF 196 KB

To consider a report of the Corporate Director of Governance & Community Strategy and Monitoring Officer. Recommendations had been made by Standards Committee on 17 October 2018, Scrutiny Committee on 7 November 2018 and the report was also to be considered by the Executive on 26 November 2018.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Corporate Director of Governance and Community Strategy and Monitoring Officer submitted a report detailing the Constitution Working Groups review and recommendations with the aim of improving openness, transparency and public engagement by the Council. The report had been considered by Standards Committee on 17 October 2018, Scrutiny Committee on 7 November 2018 and the Executive on 26 November 2018.

 

RESOLVED: That the proposed changes, as set out in the report, be approved and the Corporate Director of Governance and Community Strategy be authorised to amend the Constitution of the Council accordingly.

51.

Investment Management Board Terms of Reference pdf icon PDF 258 KB

To consider a report of the Corporate Director of Place.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Corporate Director of Place submitted a report setting out the proposed changes to the Terms of Reference for the Investment Management Board.

 

RESOLVED: That the revised Terms of Reference for the Investment Management Board, be approved.

52.

Council Tax Support Scheme for 2019/20 pdf icon PDF 400 KB

To consider a report of the Executive Member for Finance further to a referral from the Executive meeting held on 29 October 2018.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Executive Member for Finance submitted a report which summarised the current Council Tax Support Scheme and proposed changes for those who qualified for an amount below the present £5 per week threshold, for those with a non-dependant on benefits under 25 and for those in receipt of Universal Credit. The proposed changes, as recommended by the Executive, sought to remove those elements to ensure that the scheme remained fit for purpose and adapted to the impact of Universal Credit. The report also summarised the feedback from the public consultation which had been undertaken on the proposals.

 

RESOLVED - That the proposed changes to the Council Tax Support scheme for 2019/20, as recommended by the Executive on 29 October 2018 and set out in the report, be approved.

53.

Gambling Act 2005 - Statement of Gambling Policy Statement 2019-2022 pdf icon PDF 681 KB

To consider a report of the Corporate Director of Place.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Corporate Director of Place submitted a report on the requirement to prepare, consult upon and publish a Statement of Gambling Policy, in accordance with the Gambling Act 2005. The report invited the Council to consider the summary of responses received following the statutory consultation.

 

RESOLVED: That the Statement of Gambling Policy 2019-2022, as attached at Appendix 2 to the report, be adopted by the Council.

54.

Motion Submitted by the Labour Group - Breaking Point Campaign

 

This Council notes that many council budgets are now at Breaking Point. Austerity has caused huge damage to communities up and down the UK, with devastating effects on key public services that protect the most defenceless in society - children at risk, disabled adults and vulnerable older people - and the services we all rely on, like clean streets, libraries, and children’s centres;

 

   Tory cuts mean councils have lost 60p out of every £1 that the last Labour Government was spending on local government in 2010;

   Councils had to spend an extra £800m last year to meet the demand on vital services to protect children by over;

   With an aging population and growing demand adult social care faces a gap of £3.5 billion – with only 14% of council workers now confident that vulnerable local residents are safe and cared for;

   Government cuts have seen over 500 children’s centres and 475 libraries close, potholes are left unfilled, and 80% of councils’ workers now say they have no confidence in the future of local services;

   Northamptonshire has already gone bust due to Tory incompetence at both national and local level, and more councils are predicted to collapse without immediate emergency funding;

   Councils now face a further funding gap of £7.8 billion by 2025 just to keep services ‘standing still’ and meeting additional demand. Even Lord Gary Porter, the Conservative Chair of the Local Government Association, has said ‘Councils can no longer be expected to run our vital local services on a shoestring’.

 

This Council condemns Chief Secretary to the Treasury Liz Truss for stating on BBC Newsnight on 1 October 2018 that the government is “not making cuts to local authorities”, when all independent assessments of government spending show that this is entirely false; and that this Council further notes that Prime Minister Theresa May has also claimed that “austerity is over” despite planning a further £1.3bn of cuts to council budgets over the next year;

 

This Council agrees with the aims of the ‘Breaking Point’ petition signed by Labour councillors across the country, in calling for the Prime Minister and Chancellor to truly end austerity in local government by:

 

   Using the Budget to reverse next years planned £1.3bn cut to council budgets;

   Immediately investing £2 billion in children’s services and £2 billion in adult social care to stop these vital emergency services from collapsing;

   Pledging to use the Spending Review to restore council funding to 2010 levels over the next four years.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

   Support the ‘Breaking Point’ campaign, recognising the devastating impact that austerity has had on our local community;

   Ask the Leader of the Council to write to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Prime Minister, and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government setting out the funding pressures faced by our local council, and calling on the Government to truly end austerity in local government.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

It was moved and seconded that:

 

“This Council notes that many council budgets are now at Breaking Point. Austerity has caused huge damage to communities up and down the UK, with devastating effects on key public services that protect the most defenceless in society - children at risk, disabled adults and vulnerable older people - and the services we all rely on, like clean streets, libraries, and children’s centres;

 

   Tory cuts mean councils have lost 60p out of every £1 that the last Labour Government was spending on local government in 2010;

   Councils had to spend an extra £800 million last year to meet the demand on vital services to protect children by over;

   With an aging population and growing demand adult social care faces a gap of £3.5 billion – with only 14% of council workers now confident that vulnerable local residents are safe and cared for;

   Government cuts have seen over 500 children’s centres and 475 libraries close, potholes are left unfilled, and 80% of councils’ workers now say they have no confidence in the future of local services;

   Northamptonshire has already gone bust due to Tory incompetence at both national and local level, and more councils are predicted to collapse without immediate emergency funding;

   Councils now face a further funding gap of £7.8 billion by 2025 just to keep services ‘standing still’ and meeting additional demand. Even Lord Gary Porter, the Conservative Chair of the Local Government Association, has said ‘Councils can no longer be expected to run our vital local services on a shoestring’.

 

This Council condemns Chief Secretary to the Treasury Liz Truss for stating on BBC Newsnight on 1 October 2018 that the government is “not making cuts to local authorities”, when all independent assessments of government spending show that this is entirely false; and that this Council further notes that Prime Minister Theresa May has also claimed that “austerity is over” despite planning a further £1.3 billion of cuts to council budgets over the next year;

 

This Council agrees with the aims of the ‘Breaking Point’ petition signed by Labour councillors across the country, in calling for the Prime Minister and Chancellor to truly end austerity in local government by:

 

   Using the Budget to reverse next years planned £1.3 billion cut to council budgets;

   Immediately investing £2 billion in children’s services and £2 billion in adult social care to stop these vital emergency services from collapsing;

   Pledging to use the Spending Review to restore council funding to 2010 levels over the next four years.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

   Support the ‘Breaking Point’ campaign, recognising the devastating impact that austerity has had on our local community;

   Ask the Leader of the Council to write to the Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Prime Minister, and the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government setting out the funding pressures faced by our local council, and calling on the Government to truly end  ...  view the full minutes text for item 54.

55.

Motion Submitted by the Labour Group - Looked After Children and Promoting Foster Care in Trafford

 

Foster carers who combine fostering with other work say that a supportive employer can make all the difference enabling them to balance employment with caring for looked after children.

 

Foster carers are very special people who deserve all the support we can give them, they make a real difference to the lives of children and young people who come in to care. Council wants to give our employees who are fostering, or are considering becoming foster carers, the support they need to carry out this important role. We want to raise the profile of fostering and encourage people to consider becoming foster carers.

 

This Council therefore commits to implementing a Foster Friendly Human Resources policy for all Trafford Council employees who are also foster carers at the same time.   

 

Council therefore undertakes to, for our looked after children:

 

  Establish a work experience policy in the Council;

  Guarantee an interview for any care leaver that meets the person specification;

  Establish regular taster opportunities;

  Drive forward ring fencing of apprenticeships;

  Promote Job opportunities for care leavers within the Council and with partners.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(Note: Councillor Procter, the seconder of the Motion, declared a personal interest being a former Trafford Foster Carer, ending in 2010 and remained in the meeting.)

 

It was moved and seconded that:

 

“Foster carers who combine fostering with other work say that a supportive employer can make all the difference enabling them to balance employment with caring for looked after children.

 

Foster carers are very special people who deserve all the support we can give them, they make a real difference to the lives of children and young people who come in to care. Council wants to give our employees who are fostering, or are considering becoming foster carers, the support they need to carry out this important role. We want to raise the profile of fostering and encourage people to consider becoming foster carers.

 

This Council therefore commits to implementing a Foster Friendly Human Resources policy for all Trafford Council employees who are also foster carers at the same time.   

 

Council therefore undertakes to, for our looked after children:

 

  Establish a work experience policy in the Council;

      Guarantee an interview for any care leaver that meets the person specification;

      Establish regular taster opportunities;

      Drive forward ring fencing of apprenticeships;

      Promote Job opportunities for care leavers within the Council and with partners.”

 

Following speeches of support, the Motion was agreed with the unanimous consent of the Council.

 

RESOLVED: That Foster carers who combine fostering with other work say that a supportive employer can make all the difference enabling them to balance employment with caring for looked after children.

 

Foster carers are very special people who deserve all the support we can give them, they make a real difference to the lives of children and young people who come in to care. Council wants to give our employees who are fostering, or are considering becoming foster carers, the support they need to carry out this important role. We want to raise the profile of fostering and encourage people to consider becoming foster carers.

 

This Council therefore commits to implementing a Foster Friendly Human Resources policy for all Trafford Council employees who are also foster carers at the same time.   

 

Council therefore undertakes to, for our looked after children:

 

  Establish a work experience policy in the Council;

      Guarantee an interview for any care leaver that meets the person specification;

      Establish regular taster opportunities;

      Drive forward ring fencing of apprenticeships;

      Promote Job opportunities for care leavers within the Council and with partners.

56.

Motion Submitted by the Green Party Group with the support of a Liberal Democrat Member - Climate Emergency

 

Council notes the findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report ‘Global warming of 1.5°’ published on 8 October 2018, in particular:

 

-  That human activities are estimated to have already caused approximately 1.0°C of global warming above pre-industrial levels;

 

-  That if we continue at the current rate, we are likely to surpass the Paris Agreement target of 1.5°C as early as 2030;

 

-   That at the current level of commitments, the world is on course for 3°C of warming with irreversible and catastrophic consequences for humans and the natural world.

 

Council believes that:

 

-  That the impacts of global temperature rise above 1.5°C, are so severe that governments at all levels must work together and make this their top priority.

 

-  As well as large-scale improvements in health and wellbeing around the world, bold climate action can deliver economic benefits in terms of new jobs, economic savings and market opportunities.

 

Therefore, Council agrees:

 

-   To declare a ‘climate emergency’.

 

-   To establish a new task and finish group, with a remit to:

 

(i)   Seek advice from experts to develop a carbon budget and set a challenging target date for carbon neutrality in Trafford;

(ii) Consider systematically the climate change impact of each area of the Council’s activities;

(iii) Make recommendations and set an ambitious timescale for reducing these impacts;

(iv) Report to full Council with the actions the Council needs to take to address this emergency.

 

-   To require all report risk assessments to include Carbon Emission Appraisals, including presenting alternative approaches which reduce emissions wherever possible.

 

-   To task a director level officer with responsibility for reducing as rapidly as possible, the carbon emissions resulting from the Council’s activities.

 

-   To produce a report to the next Full Council on the level of investment in the fossil fuel industry that our pensions plan and other investments have.

 

-  That the leader will write to the Prime Minister to inform her that Trafford has declared a climate emergency and ask her to provide the resources and powers necessary to deal with it.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(Note: Prior to consideration of this item, the time being 8.30 p.m., the Mayor indicated that the mover would have a maximum of 2 minutes and that all other speeches would be limited to a maximum of one minute per speaker.)

 

It was moved and seconded that:

 

“Council notes the findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report ‘Global warming of 1.5°’ published on 8 October 2018, in particular:

 

-  That human activities are estimated to have already caused approximately 1.0°C of global warming above pre-industrial levels;

 

-  That if we continue at the current rate, we are likely to surpass the Paris Agreement target of 1.5°C as early as 2030;

 

-   That at the current level of commitments, the world is on course for 3°C of warming with irreversible and catastrophic consequences for humans and the natural world.

 

Council believes that:

 

-  That the impacts of global temperature rise above 1.5°C, are so severe that governments at all levels must work together and make this their top priority.

 

-  As well as large-scale improvements in health and wellbeing around the world, bold climate action can deliver economic benefits in terms of new jobs, economic savings and market opportunities.

 

Therefore, Council agrees:

 

-   To declare a ‘climate emergency’.

 

-   To establish a new task and finish group, with a remit to:

 

(i)   Seek advice from experts to develop a carbon budget and set a challenging target date for carbon neutrality in Trafford;

(ii) Consider systematically the climate change impact of each area of the Council’s activities;

(iii) Make recommendations and set an ambitious timescale for reducing these impacts;

(iv) Report to full Council with the actions the Council needs to take to address this emergency.

 

-   To require all report risk assessments to include Carbon Emission Appraisals, including presenting alternative approaches which reduce emissions wherever possible.

 

-   To task a director level officer with responsibility for reducing as rapidly as possible, the carbon emissions resulting from the Council’s activities.

 

-   To produce a report to the next Full Council on the level of investment in the fossil fuel industry that our pensions plan and other investments have.

 

-  That the Leader will write to the Prime Minister to inform her that Trafford has declared a climate emergency and ask her to provide the resources and powers necessary to deal with it.”

 

It was moved and seconded as an amendment that:

 

“Council notes the findings of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report ‘Global warming of 1.5°’ published on 8 October 2018, in particular:

 

-  That human activities are estimated to have already caused approximately 1.0°C of global warming above pre-industrial levels;

 

-  That if we continue at the current rate, we are likely to surpass the Paris Agreement target of 1.5°C as early as 2030;

 

-   That at the current level of commitments, the world is on course for 3°C of warming with irreversible and catastrophic consequences for humans and the natural world.

 

Council  ...  view the full minutes text for item 56.

57.

Joint Motion Submitted by the Liberal Democrat Group and Green Party Group - Fracking

 

The process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas (known as ‘Fracking’) is a harmful distraction from investment in clean and renewable energy. The consequences of fracking will be harmful for our borough, our region and our planet.

 

The environmental risks of ‘Fracking’ are numerous. We know that in order to best protect ourselves against runaway climate change, the majority of fossil fuel reserves must remain in the ground. Fracking makes a mockery of this imperative and produces many other side effects that are detrimental to our environment. According to the British Geological Survey, “Groundwater may be potentially contaminated by extraction of shale gas from the constituents of shale gas itself, from the formulation and deep injection of water containing a cocktail of additives used for hydraulic fracturing and from flow-back water which may have a high content of saline formation water.” In England, groundwater is used to supply a third of our drinking water according to Friends of the Earth. Fracking is an intensively industrial process with around 50 heavy goods vehicle movements a day, usually in areas where infrastructure is already poor. There are other risks to the environment including a higher risk of earthquakes - recent reports from Lancashire and the Netherlands confirm these risks - and air pollution.

 

Extensive production of shale gas is likely to undermine investment in renewable practices, which will substantially hinder the UKs ability to decarbonize its economy and fulfil the requirements of the UK Climate Change Act (2008) and the Paris Climate Agreement (2015).

 

Fracking, along with similar processes such as coal-bed methane extraction, are not only worse for the environment than renewable energy practices but they also contribute less economic benefit. It was suggested by the previous Government that Fracking could create 70,000 UK jobs. However, numbers from the USA suggest that just 4 new jobs are creating per new fracking well, meaning that a huge number of wells would needed to reach 70,000 jobs. 

 

This Council notes that:

 

-   Hydraulic Fracturing presents a clear threat to our local environment and exacerbates global climate change;

-   This Council accepts the IPCC’s conclusions that we must keep climate change within an additional 1.5 degrees Celsius;

-   That the Public Attitudes Tracker Survey showed that only 19% of the British public support Fracking whereas 81% support renewable energy;

-   Investment in renewable energy creates far more jobs than shale gas extraction.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

-   Reaffirm its opposition to Fracking in Trafford;

-   Lobby against the Government’s proposals for Fracking;

-   Request the Leader of the Council write to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy outlining this Councils opposition to Fracking and lobbying for investment in renewable energy;

-   Request the Leader of the Council write to the Leaders of Local Authorities in Greater Manchester and the Mayor of Greater Manchester asking them to join Trafford in opposing Fracking and lobbying the Government for renewable energy investment;

-   Identify ways for this Council to lead by  ...  view the full agenda text for item 57.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(Note: Prior to consideration of this item, the time being 8.41 p.m., the Mayor indicated that the mover and seconder would have a maximum of 2 minutes each and that all other speeches would be limited to a maximum of one minute per speaker.)

 

It was moved and seconded that:

 

“The process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas (known as ‘Fracking’) is a harmful distraction from investment in clean and renewable energy. The consequences of fracking will be harmful for our borough, our region and our planet.

 

The environmental risks of ‘Fracking’ are numerous. We know that in order to best protect ourselves against runaway climate change, the majority of fossil fuel reserves must remain in the ground. Fracking makes a mockery of this imperative and produces many other side effects that are detrimental to our environment. According to the British Geological Survey, “Groundwater may be potentially contaminated by extraction of shale gas from the constituents of shale gas itself, from the formulation and deep injection of water containing a cocktail of additives used for hydraulic fracturing and from flow-back water which may have a high content of saline formation water.” In England, groundwater is used to supply a third of our drinking water according to Friends of the Earth. Fracking is an intensively industrial process with around 50 heavy goods vehicle movements a day, usually in areas where infrastructure is already poor. There are other risks to the environment including a higher risk of earthquakes - recent reports from Lancashire and the Netherlands confirm these risks - and air pollution.

 

Extensive production of shale gas is likely to undermine investment in renewable practices, which will substantially hinder the UKs ability to decarbonize its economy and fulfil the requirements of the UK Climate Change Act (2008) and the Paris Climate Agreement (2015).

 

Fracking, along with similar processes such as coal-bed methane extraction, are not only worse for the environment than renewable energy practices but they also contribute less economic benefit. It was suggested by the previous Government that Fracking could create 70,000 UK jobs. However, numbers from the USA suggest that just 4 new jobs are creating per new fracking well, meaning that a huge number of wells would needed to reach 70,000 jobs. 

 

This Council notes that:

 

-   Hydraulic Fracturing presents a clear threat to our local environment and exacerbates global climate change;

-   This Council accepts the IPCC’s conclusions that we must keep climate change within an additional 1.5 degrees Celsius;

-   That the Public Attitudes Tracker Survey showed that only 19% of the British public support Fracking whereas 81% support renewable energy;

-   Investment in renewable energy creates far more jobs than shale gas extraction.

 

This Council resolves to:

 

-   Reaffirm its opposition to Fracking in Trafford;

-   Lobby against the Government’s proposals for Fracking;

-   Request the Leader of the Council write to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy outlining this Councils opposition to Fracking and lobbying for investment in renewable  ...  view the full minutes text for item 57.

58.

Motion Submitted by the Conservative Group - Altrincham Health and Wellbeing Hub

 

This Council expresses is deep disappointment that the Altrincham Health and Wellbeing Hub does not appear destined to be used for its original purpose of being home to primary and community based care services, library and community hub. 

 

Whilst it is right that the circumstances leading up to this situation are examined, the Council commits to working with its NHS partners and the wider set of stakeholders to ensure that this fantastic building is used for what it was originally intended, acknowledging that anything less will not be acceptable to the residents of Trafford.

 

The Council is opposed to the unreasonable expenditure of further taxpayer funds to convert this new build into offices, in the absence of further public information around steps taken to outline the detailed steps taken to ensure health and wellbeing services are provided from the hub.

 

Council therefore resolves to:

 

 - Make clear its position to the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership, NHS Trafford Clinical Commissioning Group and other key stakeholders as required.

 

 - Commit to working tirelessly to ensure the building is opened as it was originally intended with a full complement of health services.

 

 - Request that Health Scrutiny be engaged to ensure actions and progress are tracked on a cross party basis receiving regular updates as determined by the Chairman of the Committee.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(Note: Prior to consideration of this item, the time being 8.47 p.m., the Mayor indicated that the mover and seconder would have a maximum of 2 minutes each and that all other speeches would be limited to a maximum of one minute per speaker.)

 

It was moved and seconded that:

 

“This Council expresses its deep disappointment that the Altrincham Health and Wellbeing Hub does not appear destined to be used for its original purpose of being home to primary and community based care services, library and community hub. 

 

Whilst it is right that the circumstances leading up to this situation are examined, the Council commits to working with its NHS partners and the wider set of stakeholders to ensure that this fantastic building is used for what it was originally intended, acknowledging that anything less will not be acceptable to the residents of Trafford.

 

The Council is opposed to the unreasonable expenditure of further taxpayer funds to convert this new build into offices, in the absence of further public information around steps taken to outline the detailed steps taken to ensure health and wellbeing services are provided from the hub.

 

Council therefore resolves to:

 

 - Make clear its position to the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership, NHS Trafford Clinical Commissioning Group and other key stakeholders as required.

 

 - Commit to working tirelessly to ensure the building is opened as it was originally intended with a full complement of health services.

 

 - Request that Health Scrutiny be engaged to ensure actions and progress are tracked on a cross party basis receiving regular updates as determined by the Chairman of the Committee.”

 

It was moved and seconded as an amendment that:

 

“This Council expresses its deep disappointment that the Altrincham Health and Wellbeing Hub does not appear destined to be used for its original purpose of being home to primary and community based care services, library and community hub.

 

The Council places on record our clear expectation that the circumstances leading up to this situation are thoroughly examined and that no decisions are taken until such time as further public information is available outlining next steps for use of the hub. Council further makes clear our view that any decision on future use of this building should be in the best interest of Trafford residents, protecting taxpayer funds allocated for the delivery of patient services in the borough.

 

Council therefore resolves to:

 

 - Make clear its position to the Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership, NHS Trafford Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) and other key stakeholders as required.

 

 - Request that Health Scrutiny be engaged to scrutinise the circumstances that have led to the current situation and to track the work of the CCG’s Governing Body in moving this issue forward in the months ahead.”

 

Speeches were made in support of the amendment and the Council then signified it’s agreement by unanimous consent. The substantive Motion was then agreed unanimously by the Council.

 

RESOLVED: That this Council expresses its  ...  view the full minutes text for item 58.

59.

Motion Submitted by the Conservative Group - Car Parking Charges

 

This Council is opposed to plans recently outlined by the Labour-led administration to extend the period of charging in Council owned car parks to 8.00 p.m. from 2020/21. Council considers that after so many years effort to revitalise our town centres that this is a retrograde step that would harm a responsible evening economy, local businesses and shops. 

 

Council therefore resolves to oppose these proposals and respond to the budget consultation accordingly calling on this change and the proposed increase to be removed from the final budget proposals when issued.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(Note: Prior to consideration of this item, the time being 9.03 p.m., the Mayor indicated that the mover and seconder would have a maximum of 2 minutes each and that all other speeches would be limited to a maximum of one minute per speaker.)

 

It was moved and seconded that:

 

“This Council is opposed to plans recently outlined by the Labour-led administration to extend the period of charging in Council owned car parks to 8.00 p.m. from 2020/21. Council considers that after so many years effort to revitalise our town centres that this is a retrograde step that would harm a responsible evening economy, local businesses and shops.

 

Council therefore resolves to oppose these proposals and respond to the budget consultation accordingly calling on this change and the proposed increase to be removed from the final budget proposals when issued.”

 

It was moved and seconded as an amendment that:

 

“This Council notes plans recently outlined by the Labour-led administration to extend the period of charging in Council owned car parks to 8.00 p.m. from 2020/21. Council notes that charges for this and all other council car parking in the borough will be set at a level significantly lower (30% cheaper for the first 30 minutes) than the previous Conservative administration was charging as recently as March 2018. Council considers that reasonable car parking charges are one component of ensuring thriving town centres and supporting a responsible night time economy, along with a range of other factors including high quality public transport and active transport options.

 

Council therefore encourages all Members to review the proposals and respond to the budget consultation accordingly making their views clear as part of that process.”

 

Following a debate on the matter, the amendment was put to the vote and in accordance with Procedure Rule 16.5 a recorded vote was called for. This resulted as follows:

 

Those in favour of the amendment: Councillors Acton, Adshead, Baugh, Bennett, Bowker, Brophy, Brotherton, Coggins, Cordingley, Dillon, Duffield, Freeman, Harding, Hynes, Jarman, Jerrome, Lloyd, Longden, Malik, New, Patel, Procter, Ross, Slater, Stennett, Thomas, Walsh, A. Western, D. Western, Whitham, Whyte, Williams and Wright.

 

Those against the amendment: Councillors S.A. Anstee, S.K. Anstee, Dr. Barclay, Miss Blackburn, Boyes, Mrs. Bruer-Morris, Bunting, Butt, Carey, Chilton, Coupe, Mrs. Evans,  N. Evans, Mrs. Haddad, Holden, Hopps, Hyman, Lally, Lamb, Mitchell, Myers, Sharp, Shaw, Whetton, M. Young and Mrs. P. Young.

 

With the result of the vote being 33 in favour and 26 against, with 0 abstentions, the amendment was declared carried.

 

The substantive Motion was then put to the vote and this resulted as follows:

 

Those in favour of the substantive Motion: Councillors Acton, Adshead, Baugh, Bennett, Bowker, Brophy, Brotherton, Coggins, Cordingley, Dillon, Duffield, Freeman, Harding, Hynes, Jarman, Jerrome, Lloyd, Longden, Malik, New, Patel, Procter, Ross, Slater, Stennett, Thomas, Walsh, A. Western, D. Western, Whitham, Whyte, Williams and Wright.

 

Those against the substantive Motion: Councillors S.A. Anstee, S.K. Anstee, Dr. Barclay, Miss Blackburn, Boyes, Mrs. Bruer-Morris, Bunting, Butt, Carey, Chilton, Coupe, Mrs.  ...  view the full minutes text for item 59.

60.

Motion Submitted by the Green Party Group with the support of a Liberal Democrat Member - End the Badger Cull

 

This motion recognises the harm caused by Bovine TB to cattle but believes the Government’s national Badger Cull is the wrong answer. Recent studies produced in an Independent Scientific Review in 2018 by Professor Sir Charles Godfray, state that the cull only has a modest impact on the disease. They’re encouraging the government to follow vaccination programmes and for farms to enforce better management programmes to combat the disease.

 

A 2014 report by an Independent Expert Panel of scientists appointed by Defra to assess the effectiveness and humaneness of the 2013 pilot badger culls, concluded:

 

  The culls did not even come close to reducing badger populations by the 70% needed, the minimum level deemed to have any significant effect in reducing Bovine Tuberculosis in cattle;

  Coverage of 70% of the land in the cull area, another essential criteria for having any significant effect, could not be confirmed making the cull ineffective;

  Up to 18% of badgers shot were still alive after 5 minutes and at risk of experiencing marked pain, meaning up to 422 badgers may have suffered marked pain.

 

This Council notes:

 

  That strong objections to badger culling have been expressed in the UK which resulted in a petition of over 100,000 people in 2017;

  Parliament overwhelmingly voted by 219 votes to one in March 2014 to halt the badger cull stating the trials had "decisively failed" - though the result was non-binding;

  That despite contradicting statements there is strong scientific evidence that culling badgers has not made a difference to the numbers of bovine TB;

  That leading scientists in this field agree that a cull will make little or no difference and that free shooting has not been scientifically tested anywhere and could even spread bovine TB;

  The National Trust and the 37 County Wildlife Trusts are not allowing the cull to take place on their land and are working with farmers and landowners on alternative methods.

 

This Council agrees to:

 

  Oppose the Government’s decision to cull badgers in England;

  Urge the Government to reconsider the decision as there is no scientific, economic or moral basis for culling;

  Remind the Government that badgers are a legally protected species and to kill them without knowing the full facts is a disgrace. There is now increasing public disquiet and disbelief at the violence and animal suffering associated with the badger cull;

        To not voluntarily allow badger culling on land in its ownership or any land tenanted.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

(Note: Prior to consideration of this item, the time being 9.16 p.m., the Mayor indicated that the mover and seconder would have a maximum of 2 minutes each and that all other speeches would be limited to a maximum of one minute per speaker.)

 

It was moved and seconded that:

 

“This motion recognises the harm caused by Bovine TB to cattle but believes the Government’s national Badger Cull is the wrong answer. Recent studies produced in an Independent Scientific Review in 2018 by Professor Sir Charles Godfray, state that the cull only has a modest impact on the disease. They’re encouraging the government to follow vaccination programmes and for farms to enforce better management programmes to combat the disease.

 

A 2014 report by an Independent Expert Panel of scientists appointed by Defra to assess the effectiveness and humaneness of the 2013 pilot badger culls, concluded:

 

  The culls did not even come close to reducing badger populations by the 70% needed, the minimum level deemed to have any significant effect in reducing Bovine Tuberculosis in cattle;

  Coverage of 70% of the land in the cull area, another essential criteria for having any significant effect, could not be confirmed making the cull ineffective;

  Up to 18% of badgers shot were still alive after 5 minutes and at risk of experiencing marked pain, meaning up to 422 badgers may have suffered marked pain.

 

This Council notes:

 

  That strong objections to badger culling have been expressed in the UK which resulted in a petition of over 100,000 people in 2017;

  Parliament overwhelmingly voted by 219 votes to one in March 2014 to halt the badger cull stating the trials had "decisively failed" - though the result was non-binding;

  That despite contradicting statements there is strong scientific evidence that culling badgers has not made a difference to the numbers of bovine TB;

  That leading scientists in this field agree that a cull will make little or no difference and that free shooting has not been scientifically tested anywhere and could even spread bovine TB;

  The National Trust and the 37 County Wildlife Trusts are not allowing the cull to take place on their land and are working with farmers and landowners on alternative methods.

 

This Council agrees to:

 

    Oppose the Government’s decision to cull badgers in England;

    Urge the Government to reconsider the decision as there is no scientific, economic or moral basis for culling;

    Remind the Government that badgers are a legally protected species and to kill them without knowing the full facts is a disgrace. There is now increasing public disquiet and disbelief at the violence and animal suffering associated with the badger cull;

     To not voluntarily allow badger culling on land in its ownership or any land tenanted.”

 

Following a debate on the matter, the Motion was put to the vote and in accordance with Procedure Rule 16.5 a recorded vote was called for. This resulted as follows:  ...  view the full minutes text for item 60.